Upcoming Publication

Close Reading: What It Means for a Writer by Lynne R. Dorfman, Brian Kelley, Clare Landrigan, and Tammy Mulligan (September 2016 in Pennsylvania Reads )

Developing as a Writer, Growing as a Teacher: Dual Purposes for Participating Online, by Luke Rodesiler and Brian Kelley (January 2017 in English Journal )

Toward a Readership of "Real" People: A Case for Authentic Writing, by Luke Rodesiler and Brian Kelley (July 2017 in English Journal)

 

Past Publication

Transforming Professional Lives Through Online Participation, by Luke Rodesiler, Meeno Rami, Gary Anderson, Sarah Andersen, Cindy Beth Minnich, and Brian Kelley (July 2014 in English Journal).


In 2015 I wrote a series of lessons for the American Immigration Council: 8 Tips For Teaching How To Write a Digital Story on Immigration. The focus, writing digital stories about our family histories and heritage, includes links and samples from the students in my classes.

Student Created Video.

Uploaded by Brian Kelley on 2015-02-22.


A series of essays about my experiences growing up within an Italian (extended) family structure in Philadelphia in the 1970s and 1980s appear below. The ejournal, 210 East Rosedale, was published by the Pennsylvania Writing and Literature Project.

Looking for a Space, by Brian Kelley, begins on page 20

I remember the aluminum exterior doors popping open and slamming against the brick wall with an unintentional bang—as if I exited the building in a roaring attack of Father. My mistake caused the opposite reaction. It made me sheepish and uncertain. Furthermore, Father’s back was to me and the noise didn’t make him budge.
— Searching for a Space, by Brian Kelley

Italian Bread Slathered in Red Gravy, by Brian Kelley, begins on page 18

...’Could you believe this small, Italian woman who had nothing could leave such an impression our lives?’ We miss her like so many others in our family tree. Over the aroma of fresh, green basil and warm, Italian bread slathered with red gravy, I wish everyone in our family could sit side by side again.
— Warm Italian Bread Slathered in Red Gravy, by Brian Kelley

The Influence of a Good Man, by Brian Kelley, is on page 16.

Whenever my Uncle Joe told me about my grandfather, he hugged me afterwards. He hugged me so hard that when I was just a little boy, it hurt my bones.

”We didn’t have much. Nope. But your Pop-Pop, he made us feel like kings.”
— The Influence of a Good Man, by Brian Kelley

History is Found in a Kitchen, by Brian Kelley, is on page 6.

Ferdinand raised a family on a meager salary generated from plucking slim strands of boiling straw from enormous iron drums. Bent and molded over a hat block, he used his bare hands to manipulate the scalding reeds. Aunt Connie recalled her father’s hands as eternally swollen, hard, and red—his hands were not best described as burnt, but cooked.
— History is Found in a Kitchen, by Brian Kelley

Cent'anni to a Family Gypsy, by Brian Kelley, is on page 17.

 

 

I knew her when she spoke her mind or sometimes spoke without any mind at all—her bawdy outbursts making a room of family simultaneously blush and burst with tears. I knew that part of her because it was so bright, and red, and gleamed with her name and face. That part of her is forever washed onto others—that part of her still makes family members remember her with wry smiles.
— Cent'annie to a Family Gypsy, by Brian Kelley